Reconstructing metabolic pathways of a member of the genus Pelotomaculum suggesting its potential to oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with direct reduction of sulfate.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621294
Title:
Reconstructing metabolic pathways of a member of the genus Pelotomaculum suggesting its potential to oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with direct reduction of sulfate.
Authors:
Dong, Xiyang; Dröge, Johannes; von Toerne, Christine; Marozava, Sviatlana; McHardy, Alice C; Meckenstock, Rainer U
Abstract:
The enrichment culture BPL is able to degrade benzene with sulfate as electron acceptor and is dominated by an organism of the genus Pelotomaculum. Members of Pelotomaculum are usually known to be fermenters, undergoing syntrophy with anaerobic respiring microorganisms or methanogens. By using a metagenomic approach, we reconstructed a high-quality genome (∼2.97 Mbp, 99% completeness) for Pelotomaculum candidate BPL. The proteogenomic data suggested that (1) anaerobic benzene degradation was activated by a yet unknown mechanism for conversion of benzene to benzoyl-CoA; (2) the central benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway involved reductive dearomatization by a class II benzoyl-CoA reductase followed by hydrolytic ring cleavage and modified β-oxidation; (3) the oxidative acetyl-CoA pathway was utilized for complete oxidation to CO2. Interestingly, the genome of Pelotomaculum candidate BPL has all the genes for a complete sulfate reduction pathway including a similar electron transfer mechanism for dissimilatory sulfate reduction as in other Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria. The proteome analysis revealed that the essential enzymes for sulfate reduction were all formed during growth with benzene. Thus, our data indicated that, besides its potential to anaerobically degrade benzene, Pelotomaculum candidate BPL is the first member of the genus that can perform sulfate reduction.
Affiliation:
BRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
Reconstructing metabolic pathways of a member of the genus Pelotomaculum suggesting its potential to oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with direct reduction of sulfate. 2017, 93 (3) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.
Journal:
FEMS microbiology ecology
Issue Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621294
DOI:
10.1093/femsec/fiw254
PubMed ID:
28011598
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1574-6941
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group bioinformatics in infection research ([BRICS] BIFO)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDong, Xiyangen
dc.contributor.authorDröge, Johannesen
dc.contributor.authorvon Toerne, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorMarozava, Sviatlanaen
dc.contributor.authorMcHardy, Alice Cen
dc.contributor.authorMeckenstock, Rainer Uen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-23T11:43:46Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-23T11:43:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationReconstructing metabolic pathways of a member of the genus Pelotomaculum suggesting its potential to oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with direct reduction of sulfate. 2017, 93 (3) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.en
dc.identifier.issn1574-6941-
dc.identifier.pmid28011598-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/femsec/fiw254-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621294-
dc.description.abstractThe enrichment culture BPL is able to degrade benzene with sulfate as electron acceptor and is dominated by an organism of the genus Pelotomaculum. Members of Pelotomaculum are usually known to be fermenters, undergoing syntrophy with anaerobic respiring microorganisms or methanogens. By using a metagenomic approach, we reconstructed a high-quality genome (∼2.97 Mbp, 99% completeness) for Pelotomaculum candidate BPL. The proteogenomic data suggested that (1) anaerobic benzene degradation was activated by a yet unknown mechanism for conversion of benzene to benzoyl-CoA; (2) the central benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway involved reductive dearomatization by a class II benzoyl-CoA reductase followed by hydrolytic ring cleavage and modified β-oxidation; (3) the oxidative acetyl-CoA pathway was utilized for complete oxidation to CO2. Interestingly, the genome of Pelotomaculum candidate BPL has all the genes for a complete sulfate reduction pathway including a similar electron transfer mechanism for dissimilatory sulfate reduction as in other Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria. The proteome analysis revealed that the essential enzymes for sulfate reduction were all formed during growth with benzene. Thus, our data indicated that, besides its potential to anaerobically degrade benzene, Pelotomaculum candidate BPL is the first member of the genus that can perform sulfate reduction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshAcyl Coenzyme Aen
dc.subject.meshAnaerobiosisen
dc.subject.meshBenzeneen
dc.subject.meshCarbon Dioxideen
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Networks and Pathwaysen
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen
dc.subject.meshOxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donorsen
dc.subject.meshPeptococcaceaeen
dc.subject.meshProteomeen
dc.subject.meshSulfatesen
dc.titleReconstructing metabolic pathways of a member of the genus Pelotomaculum suggesting its potential to oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with direct reduction of sulfate.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalFEMS microbiology ecologyen

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