'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621314
Title:
'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.
Authors:
Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Mikaelyan, Aram; Gregor, Ivan; McHardy, Alice C; Tringe, Susannah Green; Hugenholtz, Phil; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas
Abstract:
Termite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis.
Affiliation:
BRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.
Citation:
'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen. 2016, 18 (8):2548-64 Environ. Microbiol.
Journal:
Environmental microbiology
Issue Date:
Sep-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10033/621314
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.13234
PubMed ID:
26914459
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-2920
Appears in Collections:
publications of the research group bioinformatics in infection research ([BRICS] BIFO)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIkeda-Ohtsubo, Wakakoen
dc.contributor.authorStrassert, Jürgen F Hen
dc.contributor.authorKöhler, Timen
dc.contributor.authorMikaelyan, Aramen
dc.contributor.authorGregor, Ivanen
dc.contributor.authorMcHardy, Alice Cen
dc.contributor.authorTringe, Susannah Greenen
dc.contributor.authorHugenholtz, Philen
dc.contributor.authorRadek, Renateen
dc.contributor.authorBrune, Andreasen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T09:15:48Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-08T09:15:48Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-
dc.identifier.citation'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen. 2016, 18 (8):2548-64 Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920-
dc.identifier.pmid26914459-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.13234-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621314-
dc.description.abstractTermite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshDeltaproteobacteriaen
dc.subject.meshDesulfovibrioen
dc.subject.meshFormate Dehydrogenasesen
dc.subject.meshGene Transfer, Horizontalen
dc.subject.meshHypermastigiaen
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridization, Fluorescenceen
dc.subject.meshIntestinesen
dc.subject.meshIsopteraen
dc.subject.meshNitrogen Fixationen
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen
dc.subject.meshSymbiosisen
dc.title'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen
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