Now showing items 1-20 of 2558

    • Breaking the vicious cycle of antibiotic killing and regrowth of biofilm-residing .

      Müsken, Mathias; Pawar, Vinay; Schwebs, Timo; Bähre, Heike; Felgner, Sebastian; Weiss, Siegfried; Häussler, Susanne; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-10-08)
      Biofilm-residing bacteria embedded in an extracellular matrix are protected from diverse physico-chemical insults. In addition to the general recalcitrance of biofilm-bacteria, high bacterial loads in biofilm-associated infections significantly diminishes the efficacy of antimicrobials due to a low per-cell antibiotic concentration. Accordingly, present antimicrobial treatment protocols, that have been established to serve the eradication of acute infections, fail to clear biofilm-associated chronic infections. In the present study, we applied automated confocal microscopy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa to monitor dynamic killing of biofilm-grown bacteria by tobramycin and colistin in real-time. We revealed that the time required for surviving bacteria to repopulate the biofilm could be taken as measure for effectiveness of the antimicrobial treatment. It depends on the: i) nature and concentration of the antibiotic, ii) duration of antibiotic treatment; iii) application as mono or combination therapy and iv) time intervals of drug administration. The vicious cycle of killing and repopulation of biofilm bacteria could also be broken in an in vivo model system by applying successive antibiotic dosages with time intervals that do not allow full reconstitution of the biofilm communities. Treatment regimens that consider the important aspects of antimicrobial killing kinetics bear the potential to improve control of biofilm regrowth. This is an important and underestimated factor that is bound to ensure sustainable treatment success of chronic infections.
    • The natural compound silvestrol inhibits hepatitis E virus (HEV) replication in vitro and in vivo.

      Todt, Daniel; Moeller, Nora; Praditya, Dimas; Kinast, Volker; Friesland, Martina; Engelmann, Michael; Verhoye, Lieven; Sayed, Ibrahim M; Behrendt, Patrick; Dao Thi, Viet Loan; Meuleman, Philip; Steinmann, Eike; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinischeInfektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (2018-09-01)
      Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans and a member of the genus Orthohepevirus in the family Hepeviridae. HEV infections are the common cause of acute hepatitis but can also take chronic courses. Ribavirin is the treatment of choice for most patients and type I interferon (IFN) has been evaluated in a few infected transplantation patients in vivo. However, no effective and specific treatments against HEV infections are currently available. In this study, we evaluated the natural compound silvestrol, isolated from the plant Aglaia foveolata, and known for its specific inhibition of the DEAD-box RNA helicase eIF4A in state-of-the-art HEV experimental model systems. Silvestrol blocked HEV replication of different subgenomic replicons in a dose-dependent manner at low nanomolar concentrations and acted additive to ribavirin (RBV). In addition, HEV p6-based full length replication and production of infectious particles was reduced in the presence of silvestrol. A pangenotypic effect of the compound was further demonstrated with primary isolates from four different human genotypes in HEV infection experiments of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. In vivo, HEV RNA levels rapidly declined in the feces of treated mice while no effect was observed in the vehicle treated control animals. In conclusion, silvestrol could be identified as pangenotypic HEV replication inhibitor in vitro with additive effect to RBV and further demonstrated high potency in vivo. The compound therefore may be considered in future treatment strategies of chronic hepatitis E in immunocompromised patients.
    • Complete genome sequence of C130_2, a novel myovirus infecting pathogenic Escherichia coli and Shigella strains.

      Sváb, Domonkos; Falgenhauer, Linda; Rohde, Manfred; Chakraborty, Trinad; Tóth, István; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-09-20)
      The genome sequence of a novel virulent bacteriophage, named " C130_2", that is morphologically a member of the family Myoviridae is reported. The 41,775-base-pair double-stranded DNA genome of C130_2 contains 59 ORFs but exhibits overall low sequence similarity to bacteriophage genomes for which sequences are publicly available. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that C130_2 represents a new phage type. C130_2 could be propagated well on enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 and other pathogenic E. coli strains, as well as on strains of various Shigella species.
    • Sialylation Is Dispensable for Early Murine Embryonic Development in Vitro.

      Abeln, Markus; Borst, Kristina M; Cajic, Samanta; Thiesler, Hauke; Kats, Elina; Albers, Iris; Kuhn, Maike; Kaever, Volkhard; Rapp, Erdmann; Münster-Kühnel, Anja; Weinhold, Birgit; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinischeInfektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (2017-07-04)
      The negatively charged nonulose sialic acid (Sia) is essential for murine development in vivo. In order to elucidate the impact of sialylation on differentiation processes in the absence of maternal influences, we generated mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines that lack CMP-Sia synthetase (CMAS) and thereby the ability to activate Sia to CMP-Sia. Loss of CMAS activity resulted in an asialo cell surface accompanied by an increase in glycoconjugates with terminal galactosyl and oligo-LacNAc residues, as well as intracellular accumulation of free Sia. Remarkably, these changes did not impact intracellular metabolites or the morphology and transcriptome of pluripotent mESC lines. Moreover, the capacity of Cmas
    • Prevalence and characterization of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus in patients with cystic fibrosis: a prospective multicentre study in Germany.

      Seufert, R; Sedlacek, L; Kahl, B; Hogardt, M; Hamprecht, A; Haase, G; Gunzer, F; Haas, A; Grauling-Halama, S; MacKenzie, C R; Essig, A; Stehling, F; Sutharsan, S; Dittmer, S; Killengray, D; Schmidt, D; Eskandarian, N; Steinmann, E; Buer, J; Hagen, F; Meis, J F; Rath, P-M; Steinmann, J; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinischeInfektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (2018-08-01)
      Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent filamentous fungus in the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this prospective multicentre study was to investigate the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus (ARAF) in respiratory secretions from CF patients across Germany and to characterize ARAF isolates by phenotypic and molecular methods. Twelve tertiary care centres from Germany participated in the study. In total, 2888 A. fumigatus isolates from 961 CF patients were screened for ARAF by using azole-containing agar plates. Antifungal susceptibility testing of isolates was performed by broth microdilution according to EUCAST guidelines. Analysis of mutations mediating resistance was performed using PCR and sequencing of the cyp51A gene. Furthermore, genotyping by microsatellite PCR was performed. Of a total of 2888 A. fumigatus isolates, 101 isolates from 51 CF patients were found to be azole resistant (prevalence per patient 5.3%). The Essen centre had the highest prevalence (9.1%) followed by Munich (7.8%), Münster (6.0%) and Hannover (5.2%). Most ARAF isolates (n = 89) carried the TR34/L98H mutation followed by eight G54E/R, one TR46/Y121F/T289A and one F219S mutation. In two isolates no mutation was found. Genotyping results showed no major clustering. Forty-five percent of CF patients with ARAF had previously received azole therapy. This is the first multicentre study analysing the prevalence of ARAF isolates in German CF patients. Because of a resistance rate of up to 9%, susceptibility testing of A. fumigatus isolates from CF patients receiving antifungal treatment should be part of standard diagnostic work-up.
    • Vitamin D Deficiency Does Not Result in a Breach of Host Defense in Murine Models of Pneumonia.

      Niederstrasser, Julia; Herr, Christian; Wolf, Lisa; Lehr, Claus M; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus 8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2016-11-01)
      Vitamin D (VitD) has a role in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism and in addition impacts the activity of the immune system. VitD deficiency might be linked to increased susceptibility to respiratory tract infection. The aim of the present study was to characterize the impact of VitD deficiency on the susceptibility to bacterial infection in murine models. C57BL/6N mice were fed a diet with or without VitD for 10 weeks. The VitD-deficient or -sufficient mice were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumoniae The colonization and inflammatory response in the lung were analyzed at defined time points. The serum 25-hydroxy-VitD concentration was significantly lower in mice on the VitD-deficient diet. In infection experiments with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumoniae, no differences could be observed in the numbers of viable bacteria or in differential cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Measurements of inflammatory cytokines (KC and interleukin-1β [IL-1β]) did not show significant differences between the groups. In conclusion, VitD-deficient animals did not show significantly increased susceptibility to infection or an altered course of infection. The immune systems of humans and mice likely respond differently to VitD. Murine models are likely not appropriate for drawing conclusions on the role of VitD in human pulmonary host defense.
    • Biophysical Screening of a Focused Library for the Discovery of CYP121 Inhibitors as Novel Antimycobacterials.

      Brengel, Christian; Thomann, Andreas; Schifrin, Alexander; Allegretta, Giuseppe; Kamal, Ahmed A M; Haupenthal, Jörg; Schnorr, Isabell; Cho, Sang Hyun; Franzblau, Scott G; Empting, Martin; Eberhard, Jens; Hartmann, Rolf W; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus 8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2017-10-09)
      The development of novel antimycobacterial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is urgently required due to the appearance of multidrug resistance (MDR) combined with complicated long-term treatment. CYP121 was shown to be a promising novel target for inhibition of mycobacterial growth. In this study, we describe the rational discovery of new CYP121 inhibitors by a systematic screening based on biophysical and microbiological methods. The best hits originating from only one structural class gave initial information about molecular motifs required for binding and activity. The initial screening procedure was followed by mode-of-action studies and further biological characterizations. The results demonstrate superior antimycobacterial efficacy and a decreased toxicity profile of our frontrunner compound relative to the reference compound econazole. Due to its low molecular weight, promising biological profile, and physicochemical properties, this compound is an excellent starting point for further rational optimization.
    • Combining MucilAir™ and Vitrocell Powder Chamber for the In Vitro Evaluation of Nasal Ointments in the Context of Aerosolized Pollen.

      Metz, Julia; Knoth, Katharina; Groß, Henrik; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Stäbler, Carolin; Bock, Udo; Hittinger, Marius; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus 8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2018-05-10)
      Hay fever is notoriously triggered when nasal mucosa is exposed to allergenic pollen. One possibility to overcome this pollen exposure may be the application of an ointment with physical protective effects. In this context, we have investigated Bepanthen® Eye and Nose Ointment and the ointment basis petrolatum as reference while using contemporary in vitro techniques. Pollen from false ragweed (Iva xanthiifolia) was used as an allergy-causing model deposited as aerosol using the Vitrocell® Powder Chamber (VPC) on Transwell® inserts, while being coated with either Bepanthen® Eye and Nose Ointment and petrolatum. No pollen penetration into ointments was observed upon confocal scanning laser microscopy during an incubation period of 2 h at 37 °C. The cellular response was further investigated by integrating the MucilAir™ cell system in the VPC and by applying pollen to Bepanthen® Eye and Nose Ointment covered cell cultures. For comparison, MucilAir™ were stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). No increased cytokine release of IL-6, TNF-α, or IL-8 was found after 4 h of pollen exposure, which demonstrates the safety of such ointments. Since nasal ointments act as a physical barrier against pollen, such preparations might support the prevention and management of hay fever. View Full-Text Keywords: allergy prevention; pollen; aerosol deposition in vitro system; nasal mucosa; Bepanthen® Eye and Nose Ointment
    • PK/PD-based adaptive tailoring of oseltamivir doses to treat within-host influenza viral infections.

      Montaseri, Ghazal; Boianelli, Alessandro; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; BRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-07-19)
      Influenza A virus (IAV) is a latent global threat to human health. In view of the risk of pandemics, prophylactic and curative treatments are essential. Oseltamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor efficiently supporting recovery from influenza infections. Current common clinical practice is a constant drug dose (75 or 150 mg) administered at regular time intervals twice a day. We aim to use quantitative systems pharmacology to propose an efficient adaptive drug scheduling. We combined the mathematical model for IAV infections validated by murine data, which captures the viral dynamics and the dynamics of the immune host response, with a pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model of oseltamivir. Next, we applied an adaptive impulsive feedback control method to systematically calculate the adaptive dose of oseltamivir in dependence on the viral load and the number of immune effectors at the time of drug administration. Our in silico results revealed that the treatment with adaptive control-based drug scheduling is able to either increase the drug virological efficacy or reduce the drug dose while keeping the same virological efficacy. Thus, adaptive adjustment of the drug dose would reduce not only the potential side effects but also the amount of stored oseltamivir required for the prevention of outbreaks.
    • Rapid access to RNA resonances by proton-detected solid-state NMR at >100 kHz MAS.

      Marchanka, Alexander; Stanek, Jan; Pintacuda, Guido; Carlomagno, Teresa; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-08-21)
      Fast (4100 kHz) magic angle spinning solid-state NMR allows combining high-sensitive proton detection with the absence of an intrinsic molecular weight limit. Using this technique we observe for the first time narrow 1H RNA resonances and assign nucleotide spin systems with only 200 lg of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled RNA.
    • Exchange of amino acids in the H1-haemagglutinin to H3 residues is required for efficient influenza A virus replication and pathology in Tmprss2 knock-out mice.

      Lambertz, Ruth L O; Pippel, Jan; Gerhauser, Ingo; Kollmus, Heike; Anhlan, Darisuren; Hrincius, Eike R; Krausze, Joern; Kühn, Nora; Schughart, Klaus; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-09-01)
      The haemagglutinin (HA) of H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes has to be activated by host proteases. Previous studies showed that H1N1 virus cannot replicate efficiently in Tmprss2/ knock-out mice whereas H3N2 viruses are able to replicate to the same levels in Tmprss2/ as in wild type (WT) mice. Here, we investigated the sequence requirements for the HA molecule that allow IAV to replicate efficiently in the absence of TMPRSS2. We showed that replacement of the H3 for the H1-loop sequence (amino acids 320 to 329, at the C-terminus of HA1) was not sufficient for equal levels of virus replication or severe pathology in Tmprss2/ knock-out mice compared to WT mice. However, exchange of a distant amino acid from H1 to H3 sequence (E31D) in addition to the HA-loop substitution resulted in virus replication in Tmprss2/ knockout mice that was comparable to WT mice. The higher virus replication and lung damage was associated with increased epithelial damage and higher mortality. Our results provide further evidence and insights into host proteases as a promising target for therapeutic intervention of IAV infections.
    • Kinetics of mRNA delivery and protein translation in dendritic cells using lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles.

      Yasar, Hanzey; Biehl, Alexander; De Rossi, Chiara; Koch, Marcus; Murgia, Xabi; Loretz, Brigitta; Lehr, Claus-Michael; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus 8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2018-09-19)
      Messenger RNA (mRNA) has gained remarkable attention as an alternative to DNA-based therapies in biomedical research. A variety of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed including lipid-based and polymer-based systems for mRNA delivery. However, both systems still lack in achieving an efficient transfection rate and a detailed understanding of the mRNA transgene expression kinetics. Therefore, quantitative analysis of the time-dependent translation behavior would provide a better understanding of mRNA's transient nature and further aid the enhancement of appropriate carriers with the perspective to generate future precision nanomedicines with quick response to treat various diseases. A lipid-polymer hybrid system complexed with mRNA was evaluated regarding its efficiency to transfect dendritic cells (DCs) by simultaneous live cell video imaging of both particle uptake and reporter gene expression. We prepared and optimized NPs consisting of poly (lactid-co-glycolid) (PLGA) coated with the cationic lipid 1, 2-di-O-octadecenyl-3-trimethylammonium propane abbreviated as LPNs. An earlier developed polymer-based delivery system (chitosan-PLGA NPs) served for comparison. Both NPs types were complexed with mRNA-mCherry at various ratios. While cellular uptake and toxicity of either NPs was comparable, LPNs showed a significantly higher transfection efficiency of ~ 80% while chitosan-PLGA NPs revealed only ~ 5%. Further kinetic analysis elicited a start of protein translation after 1 h, with a maximum after 4 h and drop of transgene expression after 48 h post-transfection, in agreement with the transient nature of mRNA. Charge-mediated complexation of mRNA to NPs enables efficient and fast cellular delivery and subsequent protein translation. While cellular uptake of both NP types was comparable, mRNA transgene expression was superior to polymer-based NPs when delivered by lipid-polymer NPs.
    • The Role of Pulmonary and Systemic Immunosenescence in Acute Lung Injury.

      Brandenberger, Christina; Kling, Katharina Maria; Vital, Marius; Christian, Mühlfeld; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-08-01)
      Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly (> 65 years), but the knowledge about origin and effects of immunosenescence in ALI is limited. Here, we investigated the immune response at pulmonary, systemic and cellular level in young (2-3 months) and old (18-19 months) C57BL/6J mice to localize and characterize effects of immunosenescence in ALI. ALI was induced by intranasal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) application and the animals were sacrificed 24 or 72 h later. Pulmonary inflammation was investigated by analyzing histopathology, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytometry and cytokine expression. Systemic serum cytokine expression, spleen lymphocyte populations and the gut microbiome were analyzed, as well as activation of alveolar and bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM)
    • New RNA-seq approaches for the study of bacterial pathogens.

      Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; C Santos, Sara; Vogel, Jörg; Helmoltz-Institut für RNA-basierteInfektionsforschung, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. (2017-01-01)
      Understanding how bacteria cause disease requires knowledge of which genes are expressed and how they are regulated during infection. While RNA-seq is now a routine method for gene expression analysis in bacterial pathogens, the past years have also witnessed a surge of novel RNA-seq based approaches going beyond standard mRNA profiling. These include variations of the technique to capture post-transcriptional networks controlled by small RNAs and to discover associated RNA-binding proteins in the pathogen itself. Dual RNA-seq analyzing pathogen and host simultaneously has revealed roles of noncoding RNAs during infection and enabled the correlation of bacterial gene activity with specific host responses. Single-cell RNA-seq studies have addressed how heterogeneity among individual host cells may determine infection outcomes.
    • An efficient synthesis of 1,6-anhydro--acetylmuramic acid from -acetylglucosamine.

      Calvert, Matthew B; Mayer, Christoph; Titz, Alexander; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus 8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2017-01-01)
      A novel synthesis of 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid is described, which proceeds in only five steps from the cheap starting material N-acetylglucosamine. This efficient synthesis should enable future studies into the importance of 1,6-anhydromuramic acid in bacterial cell wall recycling processes.
    • Novel drug targets in cell wall biosynthesis exploited by gene disruption in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

      Elamin, Ayssar A; Steinicke, Susanne; Oehlmann, Wulf; Braun, Yvonne; Wanas, Hanaa; Shuralev, Eduard A; Huck, Carmen; Maringer, Marko; Rohde, Manfred; Singh, Mahavir; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-01-01)
      For clinicians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nightmare pathogen that is one of the top three causes of opportunistic human infections. Therapy of P. aeruginosa infections is complicated due to its natural high intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Active efflux and decreased uptake of drugs due to cell wall/membrane permeability appear to be important issues in the acquired antibiotic tolerance mechanisms. Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis enzymes have been shown to be essential for pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. However, the role of these targets in virulence has not been identified in P. aeruginosa. Here, we report knockout (k.o) mutants of six cell wall biosynthesis targets (murA, PA4450; murD, PA4414; murF, PA4416; ppiB, PA1793; rmlA, PA5163; waaA, PA4988) in P. aeruginosa PAO1, and characterized these in order to find out whether these genes and their products contribute to pathogenicity and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Except waaA k.o, deletion of cell wall biosynthesis targets significantly reduced growth rate in minimal medium compared to the parent strain. The k.o mutants showed exciting changes in cell morphology and colonial architectures. Remarkably, ΔmurF cells became grossly enlarged. Moreover, the mutants were also attenuated in vivo in a mouse infection model except ΔmurF and ΔwaaA and proved to be more sensitive to macrophage-mediated killing than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the deletion of the murA gene resulted in loss of virulence activity in mice, and the virulence was restored in a plant model by unknown mechanism. This study demonstrates that cell wall targets contribute significantly to intracellular survival, in vivo growth, and pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, these findings establish a link between cell wall targets and virulence of P. aeruginosa and thus may lead to development of novel drugs for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.
    • Treatment of biofilms in bacterial vaginosis by an amphoteric tenside pessary-clinical study and microbiota analysis.

      Gottschick, Cornelia; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Vital, Marius; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Pieper, Dietmar H; Rohde, Manfred; Mendling, Werner; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-09-13)
      Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal syndrome among women in their reproductive years. It is associated with an increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections and complications like preterm labor. BV is characterized by a high recurrence rate for which biofilms frequently found on vaginal epithelial cells may be a reason. Here, we report a controlled randomized clinical trial that tested the safety and effectiveness of a newly developed pessary containing an amphoteric tenside (WO3191) to disrupt biofilms after metronidazole treatment of BV. Pessaries containing lactic acid were provided to the control group, and microbial community composition was determined via Illumina sequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The most common community state type (CST) in healthy women was characterized by Lactobacillus crispatus. In BV, diversity was high with communities dominated by either Lactobacillus iners, Prevotella bivia, Sneathia amnii, or Prevotella amnii. Women with BV and proven biofilms had an increased abundance of Sneathia sanguinegens and a decreased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis. Following metronidazole treatment, clinical symptoms cleared, Nugent score shifted to Lactobacillus dominance, biofilms disappeared, and diversity (Shannon index) was reduced in most women. Most of the patients responding to therapy exhibited a L. iners CST. Treatment with WO 3191 reduced biofilms but did not prevent recurrence. Women with high diversity after antibiotic treatment were more likely to develop recurrence. Stabilizing the low diversity healthy flora by promoting growth of health-associated Lactobacillus sp. such as L. crispatus may be beneficial for long-term female health. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02687789.
    • Chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 regulate viral encephalitis-induced hippocampal damage but not seizures.

      Käufer, Christopher; Chhatbar, Chintan; Bröer, Sonja; Waltl, Inken; Ghita, Luca; Gerhauser, Ingo; Kalinke, Ulrich; Löscher, Wolfgang; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinischeInfektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (2018-09-18)
      Viral encephalitis is a major risk factor for the development of seizures, epilepsy, and hippocampal damage with associated cognitive impairment, markedly reducing quality of life in survivors. The mechanisms underlying seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration developing during and after viral encephalitis are only incompletely understood, hampering the development of preventive treatments. Recent findings suggest that brain invasion of blood-born monocytes may be critically involved in both seizures and brain damage in response to encephalitis, whereas the relative role of microglia, the brain's resident immune cells, in these processes is not clear. CCR2 and CX3CR1 are two chemokine receptors that regulate the responses of myeloid cells, such as monocytes and microglia, during inflammation. We used
    • Aethiopinolones A-E, New Pregnenolone Type Steroids from the East African Basidiomycete Fomitiporia aethiopica.

      Chepkirui, Clara; Sum, Winnie C; Cheng, Tian; Matasyoh, Josphat C; Decock, Cony; Stadler, Marc; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-02-09)
      A mycelial culture of the Kenyan basidiomycete Fomitiporia aethiopica was fermented on rice and the cultures were extracted with methanol. Subsequent HPLC profiling and preparative chromatography of its crude extract led to the isolation of five previously undescribed pregnenolone type triterpenes 1–5, for which we propose the trivial name aethiopinolones A–E. The chemical structures of the aethiopinolones were determined by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR, and HRMS data analysis. The compounds exhibited moderate cytotoxic effects against various human cancer cell lines, but they were found devoid of significant nematicidal and antimicrobial activities. View Full-Text
    • Chronic Toxoplasma infection is associated with distinct alterations in the synaptic protein composition.

      Lang, Daniel; Schott, Björn H; van Ham, Marco; Morton, Lorena; Kulikovskaja, Leonora; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Pielot, Rainer; Klawonn, Frank; Montag, Dirk; Jänsch, Lothar; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Smalla, Karl Heinz; Dunay, Ildiko Rita; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-08-01)
      Chronic infection with the neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii has been implicated in the risk for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanisms, by which the parasite may alter neural function and behavior of the host, are not yet understood completely. Here, a novel proteomic approach using mass spectrometry was employed to investigate the alterations in synaptic protein composition in a murine model of chronic toxoplasmosis. In a candidate-based strategy, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry were applied to investigate the expression levels of key synaptic proteins in glutamatergic signaling. A comparison of the synaptosomal protein composition revealed distinct changes upon infection, with multiple proteins such as EAAT2, Shank3, AMPA receptor, and NMDA receptor subunits being downregulated, whereas inflammation-related proteins showed an upregulation. Treatment with the antiparasitic agent sulfadiazine strongly reduced tachyzoite levels and diminished neuroinflammatory mediators. However, in both conditions, a significant number of latent cysts persisted in the brain. Conversely, infection-related alterations of key synaptic protein levels could be partly reversed by the treatment. These results provide evidence for profound changes especially in synaptic protein composition in T. gondii-infected mice with a downregulation of pivotal components of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Our results suggest that the detected synaptic alterations are a consequence of the distinct neuroinflammatory milieu caused by the neurotropic parasite.