Now showing items 1-20 of 2920

    • Electro-Microbiology as a Promising Approach Towards Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability

      Ali, Jafar; Sohail, Aaqib; Wang, Lei; Rizwan Haider, Muhammad; Mulk, Shahi; Pan, Gang; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH,Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (MDPI AG, 2018-07-12)
      Microbial electrochemical technologies provide sustainable wastewater treatment and energy production. Despite significant improvements in the power output of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), this technology is still far from practical applications. Extracting electrical energy and harvesting valuable products by electroactive bacteria (EAB) in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) has emerged as an innovative approach to address energy and environmental challenges. Thus, maximizing power output and resource recovery is highly desirable for sustainable systems. Insights into the electrode-microbe interactions may help to optimize the performance of BESs for envisioned applications, and further validation by bioelectrochemical techniques is a prerequisite to completely understand the electro-microbiology. This review summarizes various extracellular electron transfer mechanisms involved in BESs. The significant role of characterization techniques in the advancement of the electro-microbiology field is discussed. Finally, diverse applications of BESs, such as resource recovery, and contributions to the pursuit of a more sustainable society are also highlighted.
    • Detrimental Effect of Type I IFNs During Acute Lung Infection With Is Mediated Through the Stimulation of Neutrophil NETosis.

      Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Bordbari, Sharareh; Spyra, Ilona; Decker, Anna Sophie; Häussler, Susanne; Vybornov, Vadim; Lang, Stephan; Jablonska, Jadwiga; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Frontiers, 2019-01-01)
      Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic multidrug-resistant pathogen, able to grow in biofilms. It causes life-threatening complications in diseases characterized by the up-regulation of type I interferon (IFN) signaling, such as cancer or viral infections. Since type I IFNs regulate multiple functions of neutrophils, which constitute the first line of anti-bacterial host defense, in this work we aimed to study how interferon-activated neutrophils influence the course of P. aeruginosa infection of the lung. In lungs of infected IFN-sufficient WT mice, significantly elevated bacteria load was observed, accompanied by the prominent lung tissue damage. At the same time IFN-deficient animals seem to be partly resistant to the infection. Lung neutrophils from such IFN-deficient animals release significantly lower amounts of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as compared to WT neutrophils. Of note, such IFN-deficient neutrophils show significantly decreased capacity to stimulate biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. Reduced biofilm production impairs in turn the survival of bacteria in a lung tissue. In line with that, treatment of neutrophils with recombinant IFN-β enhances their NETosis and stimulates biofilm formation by Pseudomonas after co-incubation with such neutrophils. Possibly, bacteria utilizes neutrophil-derived NETs as a scaffold for released biofilms. In agreement with this, in vivo treatment with ROS-scavengers, NETs disruption or usage of the bacterial strains unable to bind DNA, suppress neutrophil-mediated biofilm formation in the lungs. Together, our findings indicate that the excessive activation of neutrophils by type I IFNs leads to their boosted NETosis that in turn triggers biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa and supports its persistence in the infected lung. Targeting these mechanisms could offer a new therapeutic approach to prevent persistent bacterial infections in patients with diseases associated with the up-regulation of type I IFNs.
    • Soluble immune markers in the different phases of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

      Wiegand, Steffen B.; Beggel, Bastian; Wranke, Anika; Aliabadi, Elmira; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Xu, Cheng Jian; Li, Yang; Manns, Michael P.; Lengauer, Thomas; Wedemeyer, Heiner; et al. (Nature publishing group, 2019-10-01)
      Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may follow four different consecutive phases, which are defined by virology as well as biochemical markers and differ in terms of prognosis and need for antiviral treatment. Currently, host responses reflected by immune markers are not considered in this definition. We aimed to study soluble immune markers and their distribution in different phases of chronic HBV infection. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, we investigated a panel of 14 soluble immune markers (SIM) including CXCL10 in 333 patients with chronic HBV infection. In a small cohort of HBeAg positive patients we analyzed SIM before and after HBeAg seroconversion and compared seroconverters to patients with unknown outcome. Significant differences were documented in the levels of several SIM between the four phases of chronic HBV infection. The most pronounced difference among all investigated SIM was observed for CXCL10 concentrations with highest levels in patients with hepatitis. TGF-β and IL-17 revealed different levels between HBeAg negative patients. HBeAg positive patients with HBeAg seroconversion presented higher amounts of IL-12 before seroconversion compared to HBeAg positive patients with unknown follow up. SIM such as CXCL10 but also IL-12, TGF-β and IL-17 may be useful markers to further characterize the phase of chronic HBV infection.
    • Synchronous Germinal Center Onset Impacts the Efficiency of Antibody Responses.

      Arulraj, Theinmozhi; Binder, Sebastian C; Robert, Philippe A; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; BRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56,38106 Braunschweig, Germany. (Frontiers, 2019-01-01)
      The germinal center reaction is an important target for modulating antibody responses. Antibody production from germinal centers is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism termed antibody feedback. By imposing antibody feedback, germinal centers can interact and regulate the output of other germinal centers. Using an agent-based model of the germinal center reaction, we studied the impact of antibody feedback on kinetics and efficiency of a germinal center. Our simulations predict that high feedback of antibodies from germinal centers reduces the production of plasma cells and subsequently the efficiency of the germinal center reaction by promoting earlier termination. Affinity maturation is only weakly improved by increased antibody feedback and ultimately interrupted because of premature termination of the reaction. The model predicts that the asynchronous onset and changes in number of germinal centers could alter the efficiency of antibody response due to changes in feedback by soluble antibodies. Consequently, late initialized germinal centers have a compromised output due to higher antibody feedback from the germinal centers formed earlier. The results demonstrate potential effects of germinal center intercommunication and highlight the importance of understanding germinal center interactions for optimizing the antibody response, in particular, in the elderly and in the context of vaccination.
    • Hepatitis E Virus (HEV)-Specific T Cell Receptor Cross-Recognition: Implications for Immunotherapy.

      Soon, Chai Fen; Zhang, Shihong; Suneetha, Pothakamuri Venkata; Antunes, Dinler Amaral; Manns, Michael Peter; Raha, Solaiman; Schultze-Florey, Christian; Prinz, Immo; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sällberg Chen, Margaret; et al. (Frontiers, 2019-01-01)
      T cell immunotherapy is a concept developed for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases, based on cytotoxic T lymphocytes to target tumor- or pathogen-specific antigens. Antigen-specificity of the T cell receptors (TCRs) is an important selection criterion in the developmental design of immunotherapy. However, off-target specificity is a possible autoimmunity concern if the engineered antigen-specific T cells are cross-reacting to self-peptides in-vivo. In our recent work, we identified several hepatitis E virus (HEV)-specific TCRs as potential candidates to be developed into T cell therapy to treat chronic hepatitis E. One of the identified TCRs, targeting a HLA-A2-restricted epitope at the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (HEV-1527: LLWNTVWNM), possessed a unique multiple glycine motif in the TCR-β CDR3, which might be a factor inducing cross-reactivity. The aim of our study was to explore if this TCR could cross-recognize self-peptides to underlay autoimmunity. Indeed, we found that this HEV-1527-specific TCR could also cross-recognize an apoptosis-related epitope, Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain 9 (MYH9-478: QLFNHTMFI). While this TCR had dual specificities to both viral epitope and a self-antigen by double Dextramer binding, it was selectively functional against HEV-1527 but not activated against MYH9-478. The consecutive glycine motif in β chain may be the reason promoting TCR binding promiscuity to recognize a secondary target, thereby facilitating cross-recognition. In conclusion, candidate TCRs for immunotherapy development should be screened for autoimmune potential, especially when the TCRs exhibit unique sequence pattern.
    • The Core Proteome of Biofilm-Grown Clinical Isolates.

      Erdmann, Jelena; Thöming, Janne G; Pohl, Sarah; Pich, Andreas; Lenz, Christof; Häussler, Susanne; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MPDI, 2019-09-23)
      Comparative genomics has greatly facilitated the identification of shared as well as unique features among individual cells or tissues, and thus offers the potential to find disease markers. While proteomics is recognized for its potential to generate quantitative maps of protein expression, comparative proteomics in bacteria has been largely restricted to the comparison of single cell lines or mutant strains. In this study, we used a data independent acquisition (DIA) technique, which enables global protein quantification of large sample cohorts, to record the proteome profiles of overall 27 whole genome sequenced and transcriptionally profiled clinical isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Analysis of the proteome profiles across the 27 clinical isolates grown under planktonic and biofilm growth conditions led to the identification of a core biofilm-associated protein profile. Furthermore, we found that protein-to-mRNA ratios between different P. aeruginosa strains are well correlated, indicating conserved patterns of post-transcriptional regulation. Uncovering core regulatory pathways, which drive biofilm formation and associated antibiotic tolerance in bacterial pathogens, promise to give clues to interactions between bacterial species and their environment and could provide useful targets for new clinical interventions to combat biofilm-associated infections.
    • Discovering Yersinia-Host Interactions by Tissue Dual RNA-Seq.

      Kusmierek, Maria; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Beckstette, Michael; Nuss, Aaron M; Dersch, Petra; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer, 2019-01-01)
      A detailed knowledge about virulence-relevant genes, as well as where and when they are expressed during the course of an infection is required to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the complex host-pathogen interactions. The development of unbiased probe-independent RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches has dramatically changed transcriptomics. It allows simultaneous monitoring of genome-wide, infection-linked transcriptional alterations of the host tissue and colonizing pathogens. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation and analysis of lymphatic tissue infected with the mainly extracellularly growing pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. This method can be used as a powerful tool for the discovery of Yersinia-induced host responses, colonization and persistence strategies of the pathogen, and underlying regulatory processes. Furthermore, we describe computational methods with which we analyzed obtained datasets.
    • CRISPR RNA-Dependent Binding and Cleavage of Endogenous RNAs by the Campylobacter jejuni Cas9.

      Dugar, Gaurav; Leenay, Ryan T; Eisenbart, Sara K; Bischler, Thorsten; Aul, Belinda U; Beisel, Chase L; Sharma, Cynthia M; HIRI, Helmholtz-Institut für RNA-basierte Infektionsforschung, Josef-Shneider Strasse 2, 97080 Würzburg, Germany. (Elsevier/ Cel Press, 2018-03-01)
      Cas9 nucleases naturally utilize CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to silence foreign double-stranded DNA. While recent work has shown that some Cas9 nucleases can also target RNA, RNA recognition has required nuclease modifications or accessory factors. Here, we show that the Campylobacter jejuni Cas9 (CjCas9) can bind and cleave complementary endogenous mRNAs in a crRNA-dependent manner. Approximately 100 transcripts co-immunoprecipitated with CjCas9 and generally can be subdivided through their base-pairing potential to the four crRNAs. A subset of these RNAs was cleaved around or within the predicted binding site. Mutational analyses revealed that RNA binding was crRNA and tracrRNA dependent and that target RNA cleavage required the CjCas9 HNH domain. We further observed that RNA cleavage was PAM independent, improved with greater complementarity between the crRNA and the RNA target, and was programmable in vitro. These findings suggest that C. jejuni Cas9 is a promiscuous nuclease that can coordinately target both DNA and RNA.
    • Genomic variation and strain-specific functional adaptation in the human gut microbiome during early life.

      Vatanen, Tommi; Plichta, Damian R; Somani, Juhi; Münch, Philipp C; Arthur, Timothy D; Hall, Andrew Brantley; Rudolf, Sabine; Oakeley, Edward J; Ke, Xiaobo; Young, Rachel A; et al. (Springer-Nature, 2019-01-01)
      The human gut microbiome matures towards the adult composition during the first years of life and is implicated in early immune development. Here, we investigate the effects of microbial genomic diversity on gut microbiome development using integrated early childhood data sets collected in the DIABIMMUNE study in Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia. We show that gut microbial diversity is associated with household location and linear growth of children. Single nucleotide polymorphism- and metagenomic assembly-based strain tracking revealed large and highly dynamic microbial pangenomes, especially in the genus Bacteroides, in which we identified evidence of variability deriving from Bacteroides-targeting bacteriophages. Our analyses revealed functional consequences of strain diversity; only 10% of Finnish infants harboured Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, a subspecies specialized in human milk metabolism, whereas Russian infants commonly maintained a probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum strain in infancy. Groups of bacteria contributing to diverse, characterized metabolic pathways converged to highly subject-specific configurations over the first two years of life. This longitudinal study extends the current view of early gut microbial community assembly based on strain-level genomic variation.
    • Studies on the biologically active secondary metabolites of the new spider parasitic fungus Gibellula gamsii

      Kuephadungphan, Wilawan; Macabeo, Allan Patrick G.; Luangsa-Ard, Janet Jennifer; Tasanathai, Kanoksri; Thanakitpipattana, Donnaya; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Yuyama, Kamila; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer open Choice, 2019-02-15)
      Numerous gatherings of a new species of the genus Gibellula, closely resembling the monotypic, neotropical G. mirabilis were encountered in Thailand. The taxon was cultured successfully although no in vitro sporulation was observed. The new species, Gibellula gamsii, could be distinguished from closely related other Gibellula species on the basis of morphological features and phylogenetic inferences recruiting concatenated sequences of five DNA loci including ITS, LSU, RPB1, RPB2, and EF1-α. The secondary metabolites of G. gamsii, strain BCC47868, were studied concurrently after preparative separation of the crude extract by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two new 1,3-disubstituted β-carboline alkaloids, for which we propose the trivial names, gibellamines A (1) and B (2), were isolated. The chemical structures of these compounds were elucidated by interpretation of spectral data, generated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). The alkaloid 1 also exhibited moderate anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus.
    • Two xanthones and two rotameric (3⟶8) biflavonoids from the Cameroonian medicinal plant Allanblackia floribunda Oliv. (Guttiferae)

      Mountessou, Bel Youssouf G.; Tchamgoue, Joseph; Paul Dzoyem, Jean; Tchuenguem, Roland T.; Surup, Frank; Choudhary, Muhammad I.; Green, Ivan R.; Kouam, Simeon F.; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Elsevier BV, 2018-12)
      Two xanthones, 2-(3-hydroxy-3,3-dimethyldihydroallyl)-dihydro-6-deoxyisojacareubin (1) and dihydro-6-deoxyjacareubin (2), and two 3 ⟶ 8 rotameric biflavonoids, (2R,3S)-volkensiflavone-7-O-β-acetylglucopyranoside (3) and (2S,3S)-morelloflavone-7-O-β-acetylglucopyranoside (4), together with fifteen known compounds, were isolated from a dichloromethane/methanol (1:1, v/v) extract of the bark of the plant Allanblackia floribunda. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopic techniques and those of the known ones were deduced by comparison with data reported in the literature. The isolated biflavonoids were obtained as mixtures of conformers exhibiting duplicate NMR signals in solution at 25 °C and their respective absolute configurations were assigned using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Selected isolated compounds were assessed for their antibacterial and antioxidant properties
    • Synthesis of 4′/5′-Spirocyclopropanated Uridine and d -Xylouridine Derivatives and Their Activity against the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

      Köllmann, Christoph; Wiechert, Svenja M.; Jones, Peter G.; Pietschmann, Thomas; Werz, Daniel B.; TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH,Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (American Chemical Society, 2019-09-06)
    • Gamma secretase dependent release of the CD44 cytoplasmic tail upregulates IFI16 in cd44 <sup>-/-</sup> tumor cells, MEFs and macrophages

      Schultz, Kristin; Grieger, Christina; Li, Yong; Urbánek, Pavel; Ruschel, Anne; Minnich, Kerstin; Bruder, Dunja; Gereke, Marcus; Sechi, Antonio; Herrlich, Peter; et al. (PLOS, 2018-12-01)
    • Virtual Screening Against Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins: Evaluation and Application to Bacterial Burkholderia ambifaria Lectin.

      Dingjan, Tamir; Gillon, Émilie; Imberty, Anne; Pérez, Serge; Titz, Alexander; Ramsland, Paul A; Yuriev, Elizabeth; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (American Chemical Society, 2018-09-24)
      Bacterial adhesion to human epithelia via lectins constitutes a therapeutic opportunity to prevent infection. Specifically, BambL (the lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria) is implicated in cystic fibrosis, where lectin-mediated bacterial adhesion to fucosylated lung epithelia is suspected to play an important role. We employed structure-based virtual screening to identify inhibitors of BambL-saccharide interaction with potential therapeutic value. To enable such discovery, a virtual screening protocol was iteratively developed via 194 retrospective screening protocols against 4 bacterial lectins (BambL, BC2L-A, FimH, and LecA) with known ligands. Specific attention was given to the rigorous evaluation of retrospective screening, including calculation of analytical errors for enrichment metrics. The developed virtual screening workflow used crystallographic constraints, pharmacophore filters, and a final manual selection step. The protocol was applied to BambL, predicting 15 active compounds from virtual libraries of approximately 7 million compounds. Experimental validation using fluorescence polarization confirmed micromolar inhibitory activity for two compounds, which were further characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. Subsequent testing against LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrated binding specificity of one of the hit compounds. This report demonstrates the utility of virtual screening protocols, integrating ligand-based pharmacophore filtering and structure-based constraints, in the search for bacterial lectin inhibitors.
    • Prdx4 limits caspase-1 activation and restricts inflammasome-mediated signaling by extracellular vesicles.

      Lipinski, Simone; Pfeuffer, Steffen; Arnold, Philipp; Treitz, Christian; Aden, Konrad; Ebsen, Henriette; Falk-Paulsen, Maren; Gisch, Nicolas; Fazio, Antonella; Kuiper, Jan; et al. (2019-09-23)
    • Multiplex profiling of inflammation-related bioactive lipid mediators in Toxocara canis- and Toxocara cati-induced neurotoxocarosis.

      Waindok, Patrick; Janecek-Erfurth, Elisabeth; Lindenwald, Dimitri; Wilk, Esther; Schughart, Klaus; Geffers, Robert; Balas, Laurence; Durand, Thierry; Rund, Katharina Maria; Schebb, Nils Helge; et al. (PLOS, 2019-09-01)
      BACKGROUND: Somatic migration of Toxocara canis- and T. cati-larvae in humans may cause neurotoxocarosis (NT) when larvae accumulate and persist in the central nervous system (CNS). Host- or parasite-induced immunoregulatory processes contribute to the pathogenesis; however, detailed data on involvement of bioactive lipid mediators, e.g. oxylipins or eico-/docosanoids, which are involved in the complex molecular signalling network during infection and inflammation, are lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate if T. canis- and T. cati-induced NT affects the homeostasis of oxylipins during the course of infection, a comprehensive lipidomic profiling in brains (cerebra and cerebella) of experimentally infected C57BL/6J mice was conducted at six different time points post infection (pi) by liquid-chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Only minor changes were detected regarding pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase pathway). In contrast, a significant increase of metabolites resulting from lipoxygenase pathways was observed for both infection groups and brain regions, implicating a predominantly anti-inflammatory driven immune response. This observation was supported by a significantly increased 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE)/9-HODE ratio during the subacute phase of infection, indicating an anti-inflammatory response to neuroinfection. Except for the specialised pro-resolving mediator (SPM) neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1), which was detected in mice infected with both pathogens during the subacute phase of infection, no other SPMs were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The obtained results demonstrate the influence of Toxocara spp. on oxylipins as part of the immune response of the paratenic hosts. Furthermore, this study shows differences in the alteration of the oxylipin composition between T. canis- and T. cati-brain infection. Results contribute to a further understanding of the largely unknown pathogenesis and mechanisms of host-parasite interactions during NT.
    • Mucosal CD8+ T cell responses induced by an MCMV based vaccine vector confer protection against influenza challenge.

      Zheng, Xiaoyan; Oduro, Jennifer D; Boehme, Julia D; Borkner, Lisa; Ebensen, Thomas; Heise, Ulrike; Gereke, Marcus; Pils, Marina C; Krmpotic, Astrid; Guzmán, Carlos A; et al. (PLOS, 2019-09-01)
      Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous β-herpesvirus that establishes life-long latent infection in a high percentage of the population worldwide. CMV induces the strongest and most durable CD8+ T cell response known in human clinical medicine. Due to its unique properties, the virus represents a promising candidate vaccine vector for the induction of persistent cellular immunity. To take advantage of this, we constructed a recombinant murine CMV (MCMV) expressing an MHC-I restricted epitope from influenza A virus (IAV) H1N1 within the immediate early 2 (ie2) gene. Only mice that were immunized intranasally (i.n.) were capable of controlling IAV infection, despite the greater potency of the intraperitoneally (i.p.) vaccination in inducing a systemic IAV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The protective capacity of the i.n. immunization was associated with its ability to induce IAV-specific tissue-resident memory CD8+ T (CD8TRM) cells in the lungs. Our data demonstrate that the protective effect exerted by the i.n. immunization was critically mediated by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. CD8TRM cells promoted the induction of IFNγ and chemokines that facilitate the recruitment of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to the lungs. Overall, our results showed that locally applied MCMV vectors could induce mucosal immunity at sites of entry, providing superior immune protection against respiratory infections.
    • Diversity and community composition of particle-associated and free-living bacteria in mesopelagic and bathypelagic Southern Ocean water masses: Evidence of dispersal limitation in the Bransfield Strait

      Milici, Mathias; Vital, Marius; Tomasch, Jürgen; Badewien, Thomas H.; Giebel, Helge A.; Plumeier, Iris; Wang, Hui; Pieper, Dietmar H.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Simon, Meinhard; et al. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017-05-01)
      The Southern Ocean constitutes about 10% of the global oceans' volume and is characterized by high primary production. Particulate organic matter (POM) is exported from the photic zone to the deep ocean and sustains life of particle associated (PA) and free-living (FL) bacterial communities in the dark realm. Little is known about the composition and diversity of PA and FL bacterial communities below the photic zone and how they differ among various regions of the Southern Ocean. Therefore, we investigated the composition of small (3–8 μm) and large (> 8 μm) PA and FL (0.2–3 μm) bacterial communities between 500 m and 3600 m in the Bransfield Strait, Drake Passage, and the south Atlantic Ocean featuring also Southern Ocean water masses. PA bacterial communities had a higher OTU richness and evenness than FL ones. Taxonomic analysis revealed a different community composition between FL and PA bacteria. A large number of OTUs belonging to diverse phyla (Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) were significantly enriched on particles; in contrast very few bacterial lineages were FL specialists. Life-style (FL vs. PA) and region (Bransfield basin vs. other regions) strongly influenced bacterial communities. Depth explained only marginal fraction of the total variation (∼ 12%), suggesting that selective processes driven by depth have a smaller effect in the Southern Ocean when compared to life-style (25%) and region (31%). Overall these data indicate a strong influence of isolated water masses such as the basin of the Bransfield Strait on the composition of bacterial communities in the dark ocean. © 2017 The Authors Limnology and Oceanography published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography
    • Structurally diverse metabolites from the rare actinobacterium Saccharothrix xinjiangensis.

      Babadi, Zahra Khosravi; Sudarman, Enge; Ebrahimipour, Gholam Hossein; Primahana, Gian; Stadler, Marc; Wink, Joachim; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Japan Antibiotics Research Association, 2019-08-26)
      The bioassay-guided fractionation from cultures of the actinobacterium Saccharothrix xinjiangensis Act24Zk, collected from the Caspian Sea beach in Iran led to the isolation of three new compounds, caerulomycin M (1), saccharopyrone (2), and saccharonoic acid (3), together with the known compound, caerulomycin A (4). Their structures were elucidated from HR-ESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR data. Compound 2 displayed moderate cytotoxic activity against the human cervix carcinoma HeLa cells KB3.1 with an IC50 value of 5.4 µM.
    • Prdx4 limits caspase‐1 activation and restricts inflammasome‐mediated signaling by extracellular vesicles

      Lipinski, Simone; Pfeuffer, Steffen; Arnold, Philipp; Treitz, Christian; Aden, Konrad; Ebsen, Henriette; Falk‐Paulsen, Maren; Gisch, Nicolas; Fazio, Antonella; Kuiper, Jan; et al. (EMBO Press, 2019-09-23)
      Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes, which orchestrate the maturation of active IL-1β by proteolytic cleavage via caspase-1. Although many principles of inflammasome activation have been described, mechanisms that limit inflammasome-dependent immune responses remain poorly defined. Here, we show that the thiol-specific peroxidase peroxiredoxin-4 (Prdx4) directly regulates IL-1β generation by interfering with caspase-1 activity. We demonstrate that caspase-1 and Prdx4 form a redox-sensitive regulatory complex via caspase-1 cysteine 397 that leads to caspase-1 sequestration and inactivation. Mice lacking Prdx4 show an increased susceptibility to LPS-induced septic shock. This effect was phenocopied in mice carrying a conditional deletion of Prdx4 in the myeloid lineage (Prdx4-ΔLysMCre). Strikingly, we demonstrate that Prdx4 co-localizes with inflammasome components in extracellular vesicles (EVs) from inflammasome-activated macrophages. Purified EVs are able to transmit a robust IL-1β-dependent inflammatory response in vitro and also in recipient mice in vivo. Loss of Prdx4 boosts the pro-inflammatory potential of EVs. These findings identify Prdx4 as a critical regulator of inflammasome activity and provide new insights into remote cell-to-cell communication function of inflammasomes via macrophage-derived EVs